Measures Dashboard

Data-driven decision making and performance-based transportation planning


TRPA has been at the forefront of environmental stewardship through data-driven decision making since its inception. The performance measurement framework supports our understanding of the system’s operating effectiveness and helps to identify the projects and programs that will most effectively lead to the achievement of regional goals.

Recent federal transportation legislation (MAP-21 & FAST Act) has introduced new requirements for metropolitan planning organizations to use performance-based planning as part of regional transportation planning. TRPA has carried out performance-based planning at the regional scale for many years through the Region's threshold evaluation and transportation monitoring reports (Threshold Evaluation Reports2016 Bike/Ped Report, 2014 Transportation Report)

TRPA has developed a list of transportation measures that are used for performance-based planning (List of Measures). Monitoring and data collection for these measures is ongoing and will be accessible below as data becomes available.

Transportation Monitoring Programs

TRPA and its partners monitor conditions, collect data, and evaluate them to inform transportation policy and programs. Existing and ondoing TRPA monitoring programs include Bicycle/Pedestrian, Transit, Safety, Congestion, General Roadway, Parking, Travel Behavior, and Parking. Specific data are collected per prescribed data collection and monitoring protocols which make it reproducible, consistent, and reliable for analysis and informed decision making. Multimodal data collection and monitoring protocols provide standardization and guidance for partners to consistently collect the fine-grained modal data necessary to support the performance measurement framework. These protocols yield robust data that facilitate direct “apples to apples” comparison and trending over time, meet federal, state, and local requirements, and drive achievement of regional goals.

Select from the list of monitoring programs below for more detailed information on each individual program. The Transportation Monitoring page is currently under development and will include all transportation monitoring information, raw and analyzed data downloads, and additional tools and reports. Please check back regularly to utilize these updates as they progress.

Bicycle and Pedestrian

In 2015, as part of the update to the Active Transportation Plan, TRPA developed the Lake Tahoe Region Bicycle and Pedestrian Monitoring Protocol using best industry practices and national experts Kittleson & Associates. TRPA began implementation in summer of 2015, which built on and integrated previous monitoring efforts. In partnership with local agencies, TRPA has established a system for the collection of year-round active transportation data which includes permanent counting stations, biennial count locations, and spot count locations depending on need. During the first two years of implementation, TRPA produced a bicycle and pedestrian monitoring report which analyzes historical trends, provides detailed information by location, and compares use at similar sites. This report also supplemented the regional transportation monitoring report. Moving forward, all analysis and up-to-date data will be available on the transportation monitoring dashboard, in lieu of a hardcopy report.

To download all Bicycle & Pedestrian data please visit Tahoe Open Data.

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Safety

Safety performance measures help to assess fatalities and serious injury on all public roads regardless of ownership or functional classification. These measures are required to be incorporated into the regional transportation plan and state’s Highway Safety Improvement Programs. To support meeting these targets, a Lake Tahoe Region Safety Plan is underdevelopment which outlines crash trends, risk factors, gaps in data, and recommends strategies and designs to improve safety for all roadway users. Crash data is provided by the state of California and Nevada and consolidated by TRPA.

To download crash data please visit Tahoe Open Data.

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Congestion

Congestion can be characterized by many metrics and sourced from a variety of different data sources. For the purpose of analyzing congestion in the Tahoe region, TRPA collects data from Inrix and has calculated a congestion index for different multidirectional roadway segments. The congestion index measures the observed speed of a roadway segment in relation to the typical speed of that roadway segment. A roadway segment with a lower (negative) value indicates higher congestion. Lower negative values indicate that the observed speed on a roadway segment is much slower than the expected speed.

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Transit

TTD, TRPA, and TART work together in corridor and transit planning. Consistent transit rider surveys and operations data collection help determine the need for additional services and operating hours. Based on reporting requirements, TRPA's Productivity Improvement Program (PIP), and goals outlined in the Regional Transportation Plan, Long Range Transit Master Plan, and each transit agency's Short Range Transit Plans, the Tahoe transit monitoring program is built to track the following: Deadhead Miles and Hours, Ridership, Transit Mode Share, Productivity, On Time Performance, Operating Cost, Farebox Recovery, Rolling Stock, Equipment, Facilities, and Infrastructure. To find out more about these performance measures, take a look at the Tahoe Transit Monitoring Program: Monitoring Protocol.

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Traffic Volumes

Traffic volume monitoring is part of a regional strategy to create a well executed transportation management system that incorporates monitoring data, real-time information, and dynamic operations that respond to seasonal and periodic congestion. Over the last few years, intelligent transportation systems have seen significant advancements and deployments in the areas of data collection, data sharing, mobile solutions, and traffic monitoring capabilities. Both the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) manage several dozen permanent traffic count stations, which collect data on the number of vehicles traveling throughout the region. TRPA aggregates and analyzes this data for a variety of purposes, including project planning, development of our Regional Transportation Plan, and travel demand modeling.

To download all of the traffic volume data on this page please see Tahoe Open Data.

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Travel Behavior

The dashboard below summarises TRPA's 2018 Summer Travel Survey, which was conducted in late-August of 2018.

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Transportation Measures

TRPA uses data-driven decision making and performance-based planning to assess our transportation system and identify projects and programs that will achieve regional goals. Below are a sample of the measures that TRPA uses for performance-based planning.

Average Daily Winter Traffic Volume, Presidents' Weekend

Goal: Other

Definition: Reduce traffic volumes on the U.S. 50 Corridor by 7 percent during the winter from the 1981 base year between 4:00 p.m. and 12:00 midnight, provided that those traffic volumes shall be amended as necessary to meet the respective state standards.

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Bicycle & Pedestrian Volumes

Goal: Connectivity

Definition: Number of Bicycles and Pedestrians counted

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Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory

Goal: Environment

Definition: Tons of Annual Greenhouse Gas Emissions Region-wide

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Miles of Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes Improved or Constructed

Goal: Connectivity

Definition: Miles of bicycle paths, sidewalks and other transit routes improved, constructed or designated in the Tahoe Basin each year. Functional pedestrian and bicycle routes provide safe alternative methods of transportation, which increases personal mobility and decreases dependence on automobiles. This works to reduce pollutant emissions and improve ambient air conditions. This PM is distinct from the Miles of Trails Developed or Improved PM, which is focused on recreation and access to public lands rather than transportation.

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Miles of Roads Decommissioned or Retrofitted

Goal: Environment

Definition: The amount of city, county, state and federal roads that are retrofitted or obliterated to reduce stormwater pollution through capital improvements. This PM is reported in three categories of treatment priority based on water quality risk. Treating high-priority roads reduces stormwater pollution and cost-effectively improves the clarity of Lake Tahoe. IMPORTANT: Operations and maintenance activities are captured by other PMs and should not be reported under this PM.

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Miles of Street Sweeping

Goal: Environment

Definition: Miles of city, county and state roads that are swept to reduce stormwater pollution during each EIP reporting year as part of regular operations and maintenance procedures. Capital stormwater infrastructure improvement activities are captured by other PMs. Sweeping streets reduces a major source of pollutants in stormwater runoff that flows to Lake Tahoe and works toward reducing clarity loss.

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Serious Injuries and Fatalities

Goal: Safety

Definition: Number of Transportation Related Injuries and Fatalities

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Transit Ridership

Goal: Operations and Congestion Management

Definition: Number of transit rider miles per year

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Travel Mode Share

Goal: Connectivity

Definition: The travel mode indicators show the percentages of people using the different transportation modes available for residents and visitors of Lake Tahoe to reach their destinations. Recreation and commercial core areas were chosen as survey locations for these indicators because they represent areas to which the majority of travel is made. Commercial core areas generally cover large areas of land that capture many businesses and employment establishments. Because travel mode is influenced by weather conditions, TMPO and TRPA conduct surveys during summer and winter. Travel mode indicators are important because they demonstrate where there is a shift among residents and visitors out of their cars and into other travel modes over time.

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Vehicle Miles Traveled

Goal: Environment

Definition: Reduce vehicle miles of travel in the Basin by 10% of the 1981 base year values

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